116th Annual Conference - Bellingham, Washington
Friday, November 9 - Sunday, November 11, 2018

Vampires II: Vampire Cultures

Session Chair: 
Jennifer Henriquez, California State University Dominguez Hills
Time: 
Session 2: Friday 3:20 pm – 4:50 pm
Location: 
Carver 207
Topic Area: 

Presenters/Papers:

  1. James R. Aubrey, Metropolitan State University of Denver
    Despite widespread scorn for re-makes, such re-interpretations always reveal shifting cultural dynamics. Among the most significant cases are the re-making of Nosferatu as Nosferatu: The Vampyre (1979), Daughters of Darkness as The Hunger (1983), Let the Right One In as Let Me In (2010), and Ganja and Hess as Da Sweet Blood of Jesus (2014). 
  2. Livia Bongiovanni, California State University Dominguez Hills
    This paper builds on existing theories of abjection and abhumanism to demonstrate how the literary vampire tests the boundaries of human identity while introducing the possibility of a broader understanding of subjectivity. I conclude that the vampire may be best understood as a posthumanist figure that seeks to unify disparate categories of the human outside of the current binary-based systems of human identity.
  3. Sang-Keun Yoo, UC Riverside
    Instead of arguing Dracula in Bram Stoker’s Dracula as an Oriental Other, I argue the vampire is depicted as an Indian and Quincey Morris as an incompetent American colonizer. The novel demonstrates British men’s need to re-colonize America by highlighting their ability to colonize vampiric indigenous beings with linear temporality. The novel shows how British settlers’ colonialist logic justifies itself by making the vampire as being from the past like Indians.
  4. Jennifer Henriquez, California State University Dominguez Hills
    In the graphic novel series American Vampire (2010-present), written by Scott Snyder and illustrated by Raphael Albuquerque, Snyder reimagines the vampire figure, a mongrel species, to explore an American identity founded in notions of regeneration, exceptionalism, expansionism and social mobility.  
Session Cancelled: 
No