116th Annual Conference - Bellingham, Washington
Friday, November 9 - Sunday, November 11, 2018

Comparative Literature

Session Chair: 
Richard Sperber, Carthage College
Time: 
Session 5: Saturday 1:25 pm – 2:55 pm
Location: 
Miller Hall 15

Presenters/Papers:

  1. Jo Koster, Winthrop University
    The Sagas of Icelanders, thirteenth- and fourteenth- century quasi-historical narratives retelling the colonization and Christianization of Iceland, portray women in a variety of roles that are not typical of western European medieval narrative. My paper examines the roles played by three important female characters, both in regard to traditional representation and to the appeal of female agency to the works' original audiences.
  2. Soumaya Boughanmi, Freie Universität Berlin, Germany
    The murder of Osman II captivated many playwrights and poets in the seventeenth century. I focus on mainly three texts: the English play Osmond the Great Turk (1622) by Lodowick Carlell, the French play Osman (1647) by Tristan L’Hermite and an Ottoman poem composed probably around 1622 by Dede Ağa. I argue that Ottoman, French and English portrayals of Osman II and treatments of sovereignty show cultural transferences that blur the lines between Western Europe and the Ottoman empire despite their differences.
  3. Arpi Movsesian, University of California, Santa Barbara
    The paper discusses parallels in Dostoevsky and Heidegger's thought in terms of their penchant for the poetic word, and scrutinizes the influence of the former on the latter, and how their slective thinking when it comes to the "other" fuels zealous nationalism.
  4. Fabien Pillet, McGill University
    By a comparison between Hanif Kureishi’s Black Album and Emine Sevgi Özdamar’s The Bridge of the Golden Horn, two novels that narrativize European multiculturalism, this paper aims to demonstrate: 1) the contribution of multicultural literature to the understanding of contemporary identity, and 2) the capacity of multicultural novels to challenge certain conceptions of philosophical multiculturalism. 
Session Cancelled: 
No