116th Annual Conference - Bellingham, Washington
Friday, November 9 - Sunday, November 11, 2018

British Literature and Culture: Long 18th Century

Session Chair: 
John C. Beynon, California State University, Fresno
Time: 
Session 8: Sunday 10 am – 11:30 am
Location: 
Miller Hall 131

Presenters/Papers:

  1. Annette Hulbert, University of California Davis
    John Dryden’s rewrite of The Tempest for the Restoration stage is notorious for depicting a natural world in upheaval through ambitious stage effects: a turbulent sea, agitated spirits flitting back and forth through the sky, and of course, a lightning and thunder storm that showers the audience in fire. This essay considers how Dryden links the bizarre weather patterns of the Little Ice Age to an unpredictable political order, prompting his audience to reflect on such disparate events as the beheading of Charles I and the Fire of London.
  2. George E. Haggerty, University of California, Riverside
    Horace Walpole's incestuous tragedy is an anomaly in his work and in eighteenth-century drama as well.nWhat led the writer to this topic and why did he execute it in the way he did? These are some of the question I would like to answer in this short talk.
  3. Annamarie Carlson, Northern Arizona University
    This paper examines the curious instability in the presentation of Pompey in Francis Coventry’s The History of Pompey the Little as a thinking, feeling, nonhuman-animal subject with access to speech production. This instability, as controlled by the human narrator, limits the ability of the reader to feel empathy for Pompey’s plight in the distance it creates.
  4. Ivan Rios, Cal Poly Pomona University
    Ann Yearsley’s Poems on Various Subjects (1773) signals the socio-cultural and artistic division between Yearsley and her first patron Hannah More. More’s and her friend Elizabeth Montagu’s Blue Stocking Society does not acknowledge Yearsley’s work and many of the rustic poets have authentic poets because of their social and educational positions. Ironically, William Wordsworth’s experimental Lyrical Ballads add to Yearsley’s credibility as an authentic poet, and he recognizes the ingenuity of Yearsley that More overlooks.
Session Cancelled: 
No