115th Annual Conference - Honolulu, Hawaii
Friday, November 10 - Sunday, November 12, 2017

Translating Children’s Literature: From Aesop’s Fables to Lilo & Stitch

Lucia Aranda, University of Hawaii, Manoa

This paper focuses on the strategies used by translators of children’s literature, from the early translations of Aesop’s fables, to the Disneyfication of this literature, and the more recent foreignizing strategies which attempt to counter manipulation, censorship, and colonialism.

Proposal: 

The universality of children’s literature resides in the pedagogical nature of the stories. However, the strategies (conscious or not) used in their translation have mirrored the cultures to which they have been translated and, more often than not, naturalized these (Venuti 2010). This is due, in part, to the fact that translators not only have to contend with linguistic choices but also with a myriad of other issues such as allusions, readership or ideology.

The scholarly interest in children’s literature and, more recently, its translation (Arizpe 2006) stems from the asymmetry of its communication structure (O’Sullivan 2006), the multiplicity of its functions (Queiroga and Fernandes 2016) and the impact of the genre on the translated cultures. This paper focuses on the strategies used by translators of children’s literature, from the early translations of Aesop’s fables, to the Disneyfication of this literature, and the more recent foreignizing strategies which attempt to counter manipulation, censorship and colonialism.