115th Annual Conference - Honolulu, Hawaii
Friday, November 10 - Sunday, November 12, 2017

The Pop Pacific: Japanese and Korean Popular Music as Pan-Pacific Music

Jayson Chun, University of Hawai'i, West O'ahu

This presentation will look at the "Pop Pacific," examining Japanese and Korean popular music in a larger Pan-Pacific global context highly interconnected with popular music and events in the U.S. and with each other. In other words, what we call Korean or Japanese popular music can only be understood in the larger context of the relations between Japan, Korea, and the United States.

Proposal: 

This presentation will look at the "Pop Pacific," looking at Japanese and Korean popular music in a larger Pan-Pacific global context highly interconnected with popular music and events in the U.S and with each other. In other words, what we call Korean or Japanese popular music can only be understood in the larger context of the relations between Japan, Korea and the United States.
Just like how Paul Gilroy looked at the “Black Atlantic” where Africans and Americans interacted to create a hybrid culture we often identify as “African-American” culture, I will look at the recent emergence of a “Pop Pacific” as a space of transnational cultural construction of “Japanese popular music” and “Korean popular music”.There was a process of exchange across the Pacific mediated through the physical presence of Japantowns and Koreatowns in the U.S, American military bases in East Asia, television, and the Internet, where hybrid formations like Japanese popular music were created and manifested. This network of exchange encompassed the U.S, Japan, and South Korea (and to a lesser extent, Taiwan). So we can see the emergence of a transpacific sphere through a study of its popular music.