115th Annual Conference - Honolulu, Hawaii
Friday, November 10 - Sunday, November 12, 2017

Challenging and Engaging French Students through Early Modern French Images and Texts

Christine McCall Probes, University of South Florida
John J. Thompson, Cal Poly State University, San Luis Obispo

"Challenging and Engaging French Students through Early Modern French and Francophone Images and Texts" focuses on visual communication to advance language skills and cultural understanding. Pedagogical strategies involve images and texts as well as students' design of their own allegorical journey.

Proposal: 

Challenging and Engaging French Students through Early Modern French and Francophone Images and Texts

 

Proposal by Christine M. Probes, Professor (USF) and John Jay Thompson, Professor (Cal Poly State University, San Luis Obispo)

 

                     Our joint proposal for the WIF/PAMLA Roundtable: in-the-classroom ideas and strategies for teaching French at all levels focuses on images and texts from Early Modern France and Francophone areas. The overarching theme of this year’s PAMLA, “the sense of sight . . . ways of seeing,” is foremost in our engagement of students as they advance their language skills and cultural understanding. Chris Probes invites students to explore emblems ecocritically for both metaphorical and practical reflections on life, behavior and the environment. Pedagogical modules are structured around early modern emblems which students access digitally. In-classroom presentations in French are enhanced by research from Internet sites such as Espèces-menacées.fr, Canal D and TV5 Monde’s emissions on “terre et animaux” Out-of-classroom assignments include journaux de bord in which students record in French related experiences from explorations of the campus, local landscapes. John Thompson invites students to reflect on two different instances of visual communication from seventeenth-century France.  Starting with the well-known example of “La Carte du Tendre” from Madeleine de Scudéry’s Clélie, Histoire romaine, students explore how abstract concepts can be conceived of visually and how an author can create a persuasive narrative by strategically placing them in a “carte” or “tableau.”  Another example, this time non-literary, will place the students in the seventeenth-century Breton countryside, at about the same time as Clélie was being read in Paris.  Students analyze the Jesuit Julien Maunoir’s use of “tableaux de mission” filled with demons, angels, and scenes from daily life, then design their own allegorical journey.