113th Annual Conference - Portland, Oregon
Friday, November 6 - Sunday, November 8, 2015

Teaching French and Francophone Culture and Language Through Film

Presiding Officer: 
Marion Geiger, California State University, San Marcos

Students are easily drawn to film narratives as a medium for learning more about cultures other than their own, but need help noticing relevant information, decoding nuances of meaning, and cracking cultural codes. This session welcomes papers on methods and practices to make students better readers of film, focusing on the analysis of technical, esthetic, and cultural aspects of this art form.

Longer description:
The film historian Christian Metz nicely summarized one of the main challenges when teaching film: “A film is difficult to explain because it is easy to understand”. The more accessible a film’s narrative and characters are, the more perfect is the illusion of “understanding” for many students after a first viewing. The necessity for “close viewing” becomes clear once we start asking questions about film techniques, esthetics, and the cultural context of the elements shown in the film – which either did go unnoticed or influenced our reading in an unconscious way. The success of film classes across departments, cultures and languages demonstrates that students are easily drawn to film narratives as a medium for learning more about cultures other than their own. However, they need help noticing relevant information, decoding nuances of meaning, and cracking cultural codes. This session welcomes papers on methods and practices to make students better readers of film, focusing on the analysis of technical, esthetic, and cultural aspects of this art form.

Status: 
Closed (not accepting submissions)
Topic Type: 
Special Session